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Steven J. Gaba
Phone: 301-738-7770

Child Custody Archives

Child custody dispute begins before child is born

Many Maryland readers have gone through difficult custody struggles after a marriage or relationship ends. However, one recent child custody dispute is unique because it focuses on the extent of parental rights that are available before the child is even born. The case has received widespread media attention, and the ruling is being touted as a victory for women's rights.

Physics may offer child custody and visitation help

For many Maryland parents who divorce, maintaining a close bond with their kids is a top priority. In many cases, parents have children from more than one relationship, which can make visitation scheduling more complicated. Once those parents move on to new relationships, even more children and different child custody arrangements can factor in, making scheduling concerns overwhelming. Achieving a solution in which a parent can have his or her own children as well as those of their new partner in one weekend can seem an unattainable goal.

Ruling affects same-sex couples and sperm donation

For many in Maryland, the path to parenthood is long and winding, and may deviate from what is considered to be the American "norm." Same-sex couples are often among those who seek to expand their families through non-traditional means, as the biological requirements of creating new life lead to a need to seek an alternate path to parenthood. For many, egg or sperm donation, or even both combined with the services of a surrogate, are the best means of reaching the goal of becoming parents.

Parents fight the state in a heated child custody dispute

Maryland parents are likely to find the following case disturbing. Imagine your teenage daughter experiencing a range of serious medical issues for over a year. A specialist has been treating her with some success, and has diagnosed her as having a rare set of genetic disorders. One night, after she begins suffering from severe symptoms, you rush her to an emergency room; the specialist who has been treating her suggests that you take her to a different hospital than the one where she has been seen, due to the fact that her gastroenterologist recently moved there. Just days later, the state moves in, claiming that you are abusing your own daughter, and a long and terrible child custody dispute begins.

Child custody can be difficult battle for grandparents

Maryland families are all unique, and each shifts and adapts to meet the needs of its members; this is especially true when young children are in need of special accommodations. There are a multitude of scenarios that can lead to children moving into the care of family members other than their parents. In many cases, grandparents step up to care for their grandchildren when the going gets rough; in most instances, these arrangements serve to meet a temporary need. However, there are cases in which grandparents decide to seek child custody rights over their grandchildren, which can lead to a very specific set of legal needs.

Child custody dispute over poppy seed bagel drug test settled

In Maryland and across the country, most child custody cases revolve around divorces and deciding which parent should be responsible for raising the children most of the time, or in deciding whether a shared parenting plan may be beneficial. Sometimes, however, a child custody dispute can involve the parents pitted against a local governmental agency. This proved to be the case for a couple in another state who lost custody of their newborn child temporarily soon after her birth.

Courteney Cox and David Arquette divorce, share child custody

Child custody issues can be sticky for couples in Maryland and across the country to navigate, but they are not insurmountable for those willing to work together to further their children's best interests. Hollywood stars Courteney Cox and David Arquette recently finalized their divorce after being married for over a decade. The two have reportedly gone through an amicable split, and have a great deal of affection and respect for each other. These factors will come in handy as the two navigate their joint child custody arrangements of their 8-year-old daughter, Coco.

Child custody dispute may interest Maryland parents

Maryland parents know just how challenging child custody disputes can be. An interesting child custody case in another state reveals the fine line that judges and parents must walk when negotiating what arrangements may be in the best interests of a child. The child custody dispute seemed to center around a woman's desire to limit her children's exposure to certain religious beliefs of her husband that suggested a woman should defer to her husband in certain matters. The judge made some comments that could be construed as agreeing with the woman, which caused some to question whether the judge allowed her personal beliefs to interfere in her decision on the custody arrangements.

Judge decides child custody dispute in favor of Deion Sanders

Child custody matters are often challenging for Maryland couples going through divorce. The ongoing child custody dispute between NFL star Deion Sanders and his wife, Pilar, appears to have reached at least a temporary resolution. A jury recently returned a verdict in the child custody dispute, finding that Deion should be awarded full custody of the couple's two boys, and shared custody of their 9-year-old girl. Pilar's representative has already indicated that she plans to appeal the decision in hopes of gaining a more favorable outcome for herself.

Woman criminally charged in Maryland child custody matter

Every child custody situation is different. While a court often tries to grant shared custody, this type of arrangement is sometimes not in the best interest of the child. This is particularly true if the parents live in different states. Maryland readers may have recently heard about a child custody matter in our state that has resulted in felony charges for the noncustodial parent, who lives in another state.

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