Phone: 301-738-7770
Steven J. Gaba
Phone: 301-738-7770

If you and your fiancé can't even discuss a prenup, consider this

We're heading into Wedding Season, so I bet at least some of you out there are planning to tie the knot in just a month or two. Congratulations!

What? We can't expect that many engaged couples to be reading a family law blog, you say? Ah, well. You're probably right. Engagement, it seems, is the one time in your life when you shouldn't ever mention the word "divorce." Divorce doesn't exist for engaged couples. It's not a possibility. Right?

Of course, we all know that's not true. Whether it's really 50 percent of American marriages that end in divorce, it's certainly the case that a lot of them do -- and few people see it coming. Years later, good people find themselves in untenable situations and divorce is not only possible, it's happening. By then, frustration, disappointment and anger have built up, making it easy to quibble over issues you never imagined when you were engaged.

It's just not romantic! Why should I put a damper on the fun by bringing up a prenup?

If you're reluctant to bring up having a prenuptial agreement with your fiancé, you're not alone. According to a series of reports you can find in the Huffington Post, about a third of Americans -- in the abstract -- think prenups are a good idea, yet fewer than five percent of couples gets one.

They're not just for the wealthy, after all. If you're planning on owning a house or pooling your income, you already have substantial-enough financial issues that you could benefit from a prenup. Just as important, you can benefit from a prenup if either of you comes into the marriage with substantial debt -- say, student loans -- or if you plan on taking on shared debt once you're married -- say, a mortgage?

Have you discussed how you'll be saving for retirement, and how much? Have you talked about how you'll be handling your bills, how much you plan on savings, what investment strategies you believe in? How about and dreams of international travel or exotic vacations?

If you and your fiancé have a clear, detailed vision of your shared financial lives, discussing the possibility of a prenuptial agreement won't be difficult. If you don't, talking about a prenup may be just the jumping-off point you need to build that shared vision -- or to discover that there isn't one.

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