Phone: 301-738-7770
Steven J. Gaba, Attorney and Counselor at Law
Phone: 301-738-7770

August 2014 Archives

When spouses divorce the ones that they love

The end of a Maryland marriage often falls along predictable lines. Some couples divorce after one spouse has an affair or other indiscretion. Others find that they hold fundamentally different ideas about how to live their lives. Many simply grow apart over time, and feel that they would be happier as singles. For some, however, the decision to divorce is a powerful display of love.

Divorce sometimes doesn't sever tax connections

The end of a Maryland marriage marks the end of most connections between a husband and wife. For those without children, divorce provides a fairly clean break, and both parties are able to move forward with very little need to interact with one another. In cases in which alimony plays a role, the connection extends, at least until such time as the payments are no longer required. As long as money changes hands between former spouses, there will be a connection, at least in the eyes of the Internal Revenue Service.

Divorce brings about specific insurance needs

Most Maryland residents understand that divorce will bring about a great many shifts and changes within their daily lives. In fact, the focus of a well-executed divorce will center on minimizing the negative impact of these alterations, so that a spouse is able to move beyond the relationship with his or her financial stability intact. One area of divorce that receives too little attention involves the insurance needs that accompany this important life event.

How to break the divorce news to the children: Best practices

When Maryland parents consider filing for divorce, one of the most difficult things to contemplate is having to sit down and break the news to the kids. In fact, many spouses postpone filing for divorce until they feel that their children are emotionally prepared to accept the change in family structure. While there is likely no “best” age for kids to process divorce, there are best practices that can help parents discuss the matter in a way that kids can understand.