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Steven J. Gaba, Attorney and Counselor at Law
Phone: 301-738-7770

Divorce less common among highly educated women

A recent study suggests that Maryland women who hold a college degree or higher are less likely to divorce than women with a lower level of education. This conclusion was based on data from the National Marriage Project, which was conducted by a major university. The findings show that while divorce rates have risen for most socioeconomic groups over the past 40 years, the rate of divorce among highly educated couples has decreased.

There could be a number of factors behind this trend, and the reasons supporting a decision to remain married or file for divorce are highly unique to each couple. Some women decide to remain with a partner, even through one or more instances of infidelity, due to a strong moral foundation that does not allow her to consider the possibilities of divorce. For others, more practical concerns come into play, and the decision to remain married boils down to financial matters.

When facing the decision to remain married in spite of infidelity, many women base their decision on the fear that they would be unable to maintain the same living standards for their children in the event of a divorce. Uncertainties about the financial ramifications of a split can lead many to simply make peace with their marital scenario, no matter how hurtful a spouse's behaviors may be. While this approach is understandable, it is not a logical way to make such an important decision.

For Maryland women who are considering leaving their marriage, the first step is to sit down with a divorce attorney and review the options and likely outcomes of various choices. When a spouse becomes fully aware of their likely future financial projections, the decision-making process often becomes far easier to manage. At the end of the day, a marriage is meant to be a working and evolving relationship with a partner, and when that relationship is irreparably damaged, it may be time to move forward with a divorce filing. Understanding one's rights under Maryland law can help remove many of the unknowns from the prospect of divorce.

Source: Time, "Why Breaking Up Is Harder Than You Think: The Plight Of Huma Abedin," Susanna Schrobsdorff, July 25, 2013